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TOPIC TITLE: High Cholesterol
Created On 2/16/05 4:56 PM
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Jake28
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2/16/05 4:56 PM
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I am 30 years old, and have high cholesterol and triglyceride levels. After going on a diet and excercise program for several months, my numbers did not move. (cholesterol is 300, tgs are 350) My doctor wants me to go on medication, as levels this high in the long term are not healthy. Although I am not opposed to taking medications generally, in this case it is problematic since I had intended spending the next ten years having kids, and cholesterol lowering medications are a no-no during pregnancy. Is there anyone out there who has actually lowered their levels significantly without drugs? I am specifically interested if there are any foods are supplements which are healthy. Thanks!
 
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chanieF
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2/28/05 12:42 AM
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take omega-3. recommended by the AHA and others. 2-4 g/day (that's 2000-4000 mg.) can cause upset stomach so break it up to 4 times a day. contraindicated if bleeding problems. otherwise fine to take even during pg.y it raises the "good cholesterol" and lowers the "bad cholesterol."
FYI-can be related to other systemic conditions.
 
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Jake28
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2/28/05 4:02 PM
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Do you know anyone personally whose levels were lowered by taking these?
 
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chanieF
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2/28/05 10:28 PM
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yes. quite a few. and the studies show it too. some drs will therefore recommend it as an alternative. as mentioned, the American Heart Association recommends it based on studies as well.
however, can take some time for one to see improvement, so be patient.
 
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chanieF
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3/2/05 9:08 PM
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found something out today from someone with a family history-herself included-of high triglycerides and cholesterol. her dr recommended niacin.
apparantly, niacin (B) can also help lower cholesterol.
however, seems there are more drug interactions and potential issues.
here are some specifics...i'm sure you can find more if you do a search.


*The RDA for niacin is 14 mg for women and 16 mg for men. Specific disorders usually require higher doses.

*If You Get Too Much
It's nearly impossible to get too much niacin from foods. This is not the case with supplements, however. Keep in mind that megadoses can cause serious side effects, such as abdominal cramping, nausea, and vomiting; lightheadedness; ulcers; and skin rashes, flushing or itching. Liver damage is also a risk with long-term use of niacinamide and nicotinic acid. Inositol hexaniacinate in doses higher than 2,000 mg a day may have a blood-thinning effect.

*Special tips: Most multivitamins and B-complex supplements provide the RDA for niacin. Dosages adequate for treating specific ailments are typically found in individual niacin supplements, however.

--In general, niacin in the form of inositol hexaniacinate and niacinamide tends to cause fewer side effects than nicotinic acid.


*For treating high cholesterol, Raynaud's disease, intermittent claudication or tinnitus: Take 500 mg of inositol hexaniacinate three times a day. Continue for two months if your goal is to lower cholesterol. Stop at this point if cholesterol levels haven't improved.

*Guidelines for Use
Take niacin supplements with meals or a glass of milk to prevent stomach discomfort.

*Niacin acts like a drug when taken in high doses (1.5 to 6 grams a day). If you're contemplating using niacin in this dosage range, consult a doctor for supervision.

*When possible, substitute inositol hexaniacinate for niacinamide and nicotinic acid. Inositol hexaniacinate is the safest form available, causing no skin flushing and posing considerably less risk of liver damage.
 
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Mark3000
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7/3/07 11:37 PM
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read up about taking niacin
 
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