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TOPIC TITLE: Isolation and finding a community
Created On 7/19/05 7:09 PM
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MR
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7/19/05 7:09 PM
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There is an issue of isolation and loneliness that many people with schizophrenia experience. Perhaps this is due to impaired social skills, perhaps this is due to a feeling of being ‘different’ and from not having common experiences with the rest of the world. As a woman suffering from schizophrenia, I must say that isolation is a big problem for me. What compounds this problem is that I meet so few frum woman withing the mental-health community. I used to attend a psychosocial club where I was one of only 4 women- all the rest of the clients were men. I can’t quote a number, but there were many, many men in attendance. Before that, I attended a day treatment program where there were also few women and many, many men. Why is this so? Where are all the women? I don’t remember noticing this disparity during my hospital stays.

For me this shortage of woman means that it is difficult to make friends within the frum mental-health community. For men this means that they are very limited when it comes to dating.

I would appreciate some input on this topic.
 
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Dr. Lynn, Psy.D.
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7/20/05 12:44 AM
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MR,
Perhaps there is a group therapy you could join? Also, you don't have to meet other women in a mental health setting. Are there other interests/hobbies/avenues you can go to?
a lynn
 
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MR
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7/20/05 5:52 PM
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Thank you for your response. I do have opportunities to meet people outside the mental-health setting, because I go to school- to college- where there are many young people. But my social skills are not up to par and so I feel that it would be easier to establish a relationship with someone who understands that I have these difficulties. This is not the case in college, where it is hard for the average person to understand or relate to someone with poor social skills. I feel my best bet is to make friends with people who have similar conditions and can therefore tolerate more.

Have others noticed, too, there there are so few woman in day treatment programs? I'm wondering whether this is only my experience, or whether others have also found this to be true, and I'm wondering why this is so.
 
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Sarah
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7/21/05 7:46 AM
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Hi MR

In my daughter's day hospital program there are so far 2 men and 2 women.

Kol Tuv

Sarah


-------------------------
Daven to Hashem - He always listens to you!
 
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Dr. Lynn, Psy.D.
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7/22/05 12:08 AM
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MR,
For social skills training, I have found that a combination of behavioral therapy and group therapy can be very helpful. Group therapy could include psychoeducation (like the grps you probably have in your program), or grp therapy that is more in-depth and insight oriented.
a lynn
 
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MR
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7/22/05 1:50 PM
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Hi,

I do see a therapist once a week and she does help me alot with social skills training. She gives me tips and points things out, things that others take for granted but that I would not realize on my own. And when an exchange takes place outside of therapy, in school or at the clubhouse, where I'm not sure if I responded correctly, I bring it up in session and she gives me feedback on what I did right and what I could have done differently. I find this very helpful. The progress is slow, but there is progress.
I'm not sure whether this is behavioral therapy or not.

Malka
 
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Dr. Lynn, Psy.D.
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7/24/05 12:34 AM
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MR-
Your therapy sounds helpful and productive. Does your therapist give you "homework"? If not, ask for some. Sometimes it is helpful to have concrete goals to achieve.
a lynn
 
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Torsalicious613
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12/6/05 5:24 PM
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hi all,i do not have schitzophrenia, but i sympathize with your problems/ issues. i myself am bipolar, okay i HAVE bipolar disorder (i know that is more pc to say). anyway, i do have schitzoeffective disorder, a kind of bipolar disorder, perhaps a midpoint between mania and schitzophrenia. in other words, i do have schitzophrenic symptoms. i.e. anxiety, social apprehension,although i do not "hear voices" or "see things". i had one psychotic (more manic, than anything else), episode when i was 14. i take meds now, and at 22, i am slowly being weened off. in my opinion, 8 years is long enough to take meds that i feel i don't need ( i may have to take 1 lithium pill for the rest of my life or at times, to prevent mania, but i hope it comes down to that at worst). anyway, are there social skill groups? i go to college, but find it hard socially, although i'm doing well acedemically. i have a few friends and am "friendly" with people, but it's not the same as other kids. often it's more loaded with me than it is with them. i live at home, and am constantly getting in fights with my mom at the end of the night when i have to take my meds, and we both come home from a "long" day. (she doesn't work, but does various things to keep her busy, i go to college.) when we fight, she keeps threatening to send me away. believe me, i wanna get away from home almost as much if not more than she wants me to, but she wants to send me to a "copmmunity" where i could perhaps get "help" and "deal" with my issues,probably somewhere in ny like ohel or something. yeah right mom, if you think that's going to happen, you're dreaming. i wanna,mysel;f,move to an appt near college, so i can be away from my mom and the rest of my family for once in my life. my mom's concerned about me taking my meds, which is probably a valid concern, because even though i know i need them (to a certain extent), if it were up to me i probably wouldn't take them on my own. this summer i plan to learn how to drive, which would give me more freedom to a dgree. my brother's 17, and has his own car, so if i pass my driver's exam, why couldn't i? i've got to go to class now, buit i'll talk to y'all later. bye. any ideas in the meantime? i'd like to hear from you guys what you think.

atara


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what the hecka is a signiature?
 
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Torsalicious613
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1/4/06 5:59 PM
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come on, someone, write somethin! this is a catroom/message board for a reason!

atara


-------------------------
what the hecka is a signiature?
 
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superrepentant
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11/29/06 9:09 AM
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do you ( or anyone ) know of a group or organisation that helps mentally/emotionally challenged people in finding shiduchim?
 
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chocolatemoose sarag
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1/20/07 10:45 AM
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try ohel.com
 
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chocolatemoose sarag
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1/20/07 10:47 AM
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try ohel.com
 
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RuchamaShayna
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1/8/09 2:03 PM
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I'm posting the name of a book you all should read. If any of you have been diagnosed or have a loved one diagnosed, it is a very important book to read because it explains that it is usually not so weird or so hopeless when someone is diagnosed, and that a lot of medication is not the way to go--it may be okay to use for a very short time, but it's really not good to use for long, and it is usually a bad idea to use medication as the only way to get better. It won't work. An excellent support system works much better than medication for most. I know this is true, becasue I've been through this. The author of this book has been curing so-called "hopeless cases" with attentiveness and kindness since he was in COLLEGE, and he is not the only one who can help people. His book doesn't only explain what works and what doesn't--it also has a list of doctors and places that can help in a kind and loving way. The reason these listed doctors and facilities have a much higher rate of success is because they treat the patients with compassion and respect, which people suffering from so-called mental disorders desperately need.

I copied this from his website for you. I read this book a while ago and found it very helpful, and I think it will help you, too.

Toxic Psychiatry:
Why therapy, empathy, and love must replace the drugs, electroshock, and biochemical theories of the “new psychiatry.”
by Peter Breggin, M.D.
Paperback published 1991 by St. Martin's Press

Toxic Psychiatry remains Dr. Breggin's most complete overview of psychiatry and psychiatric medication. It has influenced many professionals and lay persons to transform their views on the superior value of psychosocial approaches compared to medication and electroshock.
 
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